Works Cited by Deleuze & Guattari in Capitalism & Schizophrenia

One of my goals this year is to start reading Deleuze & Guattari’s two-volume Capitalism & Schizophrenia series. I’m familiar with the work of Guattari thanks to Gary Genosko’s excellent (though at times mind-bogglingly recondite) introduction to his work, though I admit that all my current knowledge about Deleuze has been accumulated solely through blogs and discussions. I decided to peek at the endnotes of both texts with an eye out for ‘pre-readings’, since I not only want to know what they are saying, but how they came to their conclusions. Not that I intend to postpone reading D&G until I finish all of these, but at the very least, I think that one should be somewhat familiar with the works’ antecedents, even if that just means reading their Wiki pages. These, then, are the authors and works they cite for each respective text; multiple works by the same author are separated by plus signs.

Anti-Oedipus

  • Althusser & Balibar – Reading Capital
  • Artaud – The Theatre and Its Double
  • Baran & Sweezy – Monopoly Capital
  • Blanchot – Friendship
  • Derrida – Of Grammatology + Writing & Difference
  • Fanon – The Wretched of The Earth
  • Foucault – History of Madness + The Order of Things 
  • Kafka – 
  • Klossowski – Nietzsche & the Vicious Circle
  • Lacan – Écrits
  • Laing – Self & Others
  • Lawrence, D.H. – Aaron’s Rod + Psychoanalysis & The Unconscious
  • Lévi-Strauss – The Elementary Structures of Kinship + The Raw & The Cooked
  • Lyotard – Discourse, Figure
  • Marcuse – Eros & Civilization
  • Marx – 
  • Mumford – The Myth of the Machine 
  • Nietzsche – On The Genealogy of Morals
  • Reich – The Mass Psychology of Fascism + The Function of the Orgasm
  • Rimbaud – 
  • Sartre – Critique of Dialectical Reason
  • Schmitt – Money, Salary, & Profits
  • Simondon – On The Mode of Existence of Technical Objects

A Thousand Plateaus

  • Althusser – Ideology & Ideological State Apparatuses
  • Bachelard – L’autreament + The Dialectic of Duration 
  • Barthes – The Responsibility of Forms
  • Bateson – Steps To An Ecology of Mind
  • Benveniste – Problems in General Linguistics
  • Bergson – Time & Free Will
  • ‘Bifo’ Berardi – 
  • Blanchot – The Work of Fire + The Space of Literature 
  • Bourdieu – Language & Symbolic Power + “The Economy of Linguistic Exchanges”
  • Canguilhem – On The Normal & The Pathological
  • Chomsky – Language & Responsibility: Based on Conversations With Mitsou Ronat 
  • Clastres – Society Against The State
  • Clausewitz – On War
  • Dostoevsky – The Double
  • Eisenstein – Film Form & Film Sense
  • Fitzgerald – The Crack-Up
  • Foucault – Discipline & Punish + The Archaeology of Knowledge + The History of Sexuality
  • Galbraith, John Kenneth – Money
  • Goethe – Faust
  • Greimas – 
  • Hjelmslev – Prolegomena to a Theory of Language + Language: An Introduction + Essais Linguistiques
  • Husserl – The Phenomenology of Internal Time-Consciousness
  • Jacob – The Logic of Life
  • Jung – Symbols of Transformation
  • Junger – The Glass Bees
  • Kafka – The Castle + The Stoker + Diaries + The Trial + Blumfeld: An Elderly Gentleman
  • Kandinsky – Concerning The Spiritual In Art
  • Kierkegaard – Fear & Trembling + The Concept of Dread
  • Klee – On Modern Art
  • Klossowski – The Laws of Hospitality
  • Kristeva – 
  • Labov – Sociolinguistic Patterns
  • Lawrence, D.H. – Apocalypse
  • Lenin – “On Slogans”
  • Lévi-Strauss – Introduction to the Work of Marcel Mauss + The Savage Mind + Sun Chief + Structural Anthropology + Totemism
  • Lewin, Kurt – “Psychological Ecology”
  • Luxemburg – Selected Political Writings
  • Mandelbrot – Fractals: Form, Chance, & Dimension
  • Melville – Moby Dick
  • Monod – Chance & Necessity
  • Negri – Marx Beyond Marx: Lessons on the Grundrisse
  • Nietzsche – The Birth of Tragedy + Untimely Meditations + The Will To Power 
  • Peirce – Collected Papers
  • Plato – Timaeus
  • Proust – Remembrance of Things Past
  • Reich – Character-Analysis
  • Ricardo – On The Principles of Political Economy
  • Russell – The Principles of Mathematics
  • Schreber – Memoirs of My Nervous Illness
  • Semiotext(e) – Autonomia: Post-Political Politics
  • Serres – The Birth of Physics
  • Simondon – The Individual & Its Physico-Biological Genesis
  • Stalin – Marxism & Problems of Linguistics 
  • Tarde – Social Logic 
  • Klein – Narrative of a Child Analysis [Richard]
  • Uexküll – The World of Animals & The World of Humans
  • Vernant – Myth & Thought Among The Greeks
  • Virilio – Speed & Politics
  • Voloshinov – Marxism & The Philosophy of Language 
  • Woolf – Mrs. Dalloway + The Waves + The Diary of Virginia Woolf

**Note: This is not at all a comprehensive list, and I’m sure that some books which are quite important to D&G have not been mentioned at all. I would appreciate if people could list in the comments section the books that I have missed.

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About Graham Joncas

We are a way for capital to know itself.

Posted on September 10, 2011, in Philosophy and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink. 1 Comment.

  1. Freud and Nietzsche are especially important for AO. Having a point of comparison between schizoanalysis and the Lacanian version of Freudo-Marxist might be useful, too, (look to LaPlanche and Pontalis’ dictionary).

    Spinoza and Bergson are an important undercurrent in ATP. You’ve noted some of Bergson, but the more important texts are Matter and Memory and Creative Mind.

    But as you’ll find out quickly, each plateau seems to have its own constellation of references. D&G usually proceed by using a standard reference as a foil for their more eclectic/dissident set of references. The references they bring up are less important that the trajectory they gesture to (ie: one need not read Bergson to be Bergsonian, etc), in contrast to AO which is a much ‘coherent’ argument in the philosophical sense.

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